Review: Worshipping with Calvin

Johnson, Terry L. “Worshipping with Calvin: Recovering the Historic Ministry and Worship of Reformed Protestantism,” Darlington, England: 2014. 460 pp. $23.99

The recent resurgence of Calvinistic soteriology and Reformation theology has sparked many a conversation and produced quite a few popular-level books by the “Young, Restless, and Reformed” crowd. Although we’ve seen many responses to these works, typically addressing the theology and general ideology of the New Calvinism movement, Terry Johnson sets out to provide a scholarly work that focuses on the elements of Reformed worship.

In “Worshipping with Calvin,” Johnson presents extensive biblical and historical arguments for how a local church should conduct its worship services. He begins by looking at the contemporary evangelical landscape and the unfortunate historical and theological anemia that plagues it. After offering a comparison between the early Church and the current state of the western Church, and giving a brief historical survey of the 20th century “worship wars,” he provides strong exegetical, historical, and theological arguments in favor of a decidedly Reformed approach to worship and ministry.

Next, the author emphasizes the strengths of Reformed worship and ministry. He contends that this particular approach to liturgy is God-centered, Bible-filled, Gospel-structured, Church-aware, and Spirit-dependent.

This book was a great encouragement to me. I am in agreement with much of what is said within, but there are several arguments that the author gives that either changed my mind or solidified an existing position. For instance, Johnson has convinced me of the use of lectio continua (consecutive reading) Bible readings and singing Psalms in corporate worship. While previously, I have utilized lectio selecta (selective reading) Scripture readings to “reinforce” the passage preached, the author has convinced me of the wisdom in implementing a continuous reading of both the Old and New Testaments. Furthermore, while I have understood the importance of the Psalms for corporate worship, this book has convinced me of their necessity. Without dogmatically promoting a strict Psalms-only liturgical model, the author insists the inclusion of the Psalter and has convinced me that it is necessary to regularly and consistently involve Psalms in a worship service.

As a Reformed Baptist, I am in disagreement with the author’s views with regard to Covenant Theology and the sacrament of baptism (it is unfortunate that his treatment of credobaptism in chapter 6 only addresses the 16th century Anabaptists and not the 17th century Particular Baptists—though I acknowledge the book’s emphasis on John Calvin and the potential for anachronism), and while I have reservations with Johnson’s observations about ethnicity, his research is top-notch. Regardless of any covenantal differences I may have with Johnson, I strongly agree with the over-arching theme of this book—that our worship should be prescribed by Scripture and rooted in the historicity of the Church (and particularly that of the Reformation period). The cultural trends and encroachment of worldliness in contemporary American Christianity have spurned a new downgrade in the liturgical life of the Church, and my hope is that books like this will precipitate a doxological reformation in local evangelical churches.

Although this is a book primarily aimed at Presbyterians, I would recommend this book to any one who claims to be a Protestant Christian—particularly Pastors and Elders. Johnson offers a cogent exhortation for modern Christians to compare their liturgy with Scripture and Church history. He provides an abundance of Scriptural references, and quotes a multitude of well-known Pastors, theologians, and church historians (around 37% of the book is comprised of a bibliography and notes) to support his position. Terry Johnson’s “Worshipping with Calvin” is a helpful resource for Christians who want to glorify God in worship according to His Word.

For more on this subject, please visit the Historical Theology page.

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Effective December 1, 2009, Federal Trade Commission guidelines state that bloggers receiving any kind of compensation should disclose that information clearly on their blog when posting a review of the product… that being said: I RECEIVED A FREE COPY OF THE BOOK.

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What Does it Mean?

WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

“The biblical witness cannot be properly appreciated without the illuminating aid of the Spirit. The illumination which he imparts to the believing reader may differ in degree, but does not differ in kind, from the inspiration which moved the original speakers or writers, so that their words became the vehicle of God’s Word. The Spirit’s role is to testify of Christ, and he does so not least in Scripture. The Christocentric understanding of Scripture is not imposed on it from without, and not read into it by allegorization or any other artificial means; it is implicit in the message of Scripture, as that message is made plain by the Spirit. To grasp the witness of Scripture to Christ is the chief end of biblical interpretation.” (F.F. Bruce)

For more on the subject, visit the Systematic Theology page.

 

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Interpreting the Bible

Wave Perspective in Biblical Interpretation

“Individuals and communities grow gradually in the knowledge of Scripture and its implications. Growth is a wave; it is a process. Within this life it does not come to an end.

The process includes moments of careful, exacting analysis of word meanings, grammatical constructions, and ancient cultural contexts. The careful, exacting analysis haw come to be associated with the label ‘grammatical-historical interpretation.’ Bible scholars in particular endeavor to discipline themselves, so as not merely to read in what they want. They try to see what God was saying to people back in the remote past, as a check on the sinful tendency to make the Bible say something that leaves the present reader comfortable with his sin. This is a valuable contribution to the body of Christ, particularly because whole groups of Christians may collectively develop a subculture and a tradition that finds ways to ‘tame’ the message of the Bible. The tradition distorts the Bible in order to avoid the pain of confronting the community’s corporate sins. The scholarly investigation is a process, but its goal is a stable meaning, in particular meaning that would have been in the human author’s mind or would be perceptible to the original readers.” (Vern Poythress)

For more on the subject, visit the Exegetical Theology page.

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