Notable & Newsworthy

Here are the links and stories for the day…

Get Geerhardus Vos’ “Redemptive History and Biblical Theology: The Shorter Writings of Geerhardus Vos” and “Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments” for 43% OFF at Westminster Bookstore

Get William Edgar’s “A Transforming Vision: The Lord’s Prayer as a Lens for Life” for up to 67% OFF at Westminster Bookstore

Download R.C. Sproul’s “5 Things Every Christian Needs to Grow” for FREE from Reformation Trust and Ligonier Ministries

Enter to win The Complete Sermon Collection of Charles Spurgeon (63-Volumes) for Logos Bible Software from Adrian Warnock

Enter to win an iPad Mini and a couple of books from 20 Schemes

Get Hunter Baker’s “Political Thought: A Student’s Guide” for only 99¢ for Amazon Kindle

Get Louis Markos’ “Philosophy: A Student’s Guide” for only 99¢ for Amazon Kindle

Get Gene Fant’s “The Liberal Arts: A Student’s Guide” for only 99¢ for Amazon Kindle

Get Walter Brueggemann’s “Spirituality of the Psalms” for FREE for Logos Bible Software and enter to win the 24-volume collection

Enter to win a subscription to Leadership Journal from The Brave Reviews

Download Brian Howard’s “100 Principles of Leadership” for FREE

Matt Slick on responding to Jehovah’s Witnesses’ attacks on the deity of Jesus Christ

“Where the plow does not go and the seed is not sown, the weeds are sure to multiply. And if children are left untrained, all sorts of evil will spring up in their hearts and lives.” (Charles Spurgeon)

Please take some time to browse the other pages on this site (located in the tabs above). You’ll find several articles, FREE e-books, and book recommendations for your encouragement and edification. Check out the Exegetical Theology page or Apologetics page first… Soli Deo Gloria!

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The Messiahship

THE MESSIAHSHIP

“The sonship to which our Lord traces back His Messianic commission is not something that we have in common with Him, not a purely ethico-religious relation to God, not something pertaining to His temporal human existence—but something unique, reaching back into His preexistent, premundane life; in a word it is nothing less than His Deity, or, strictly speaking, the relation which in His divine nature He sustains to the Father. It is that in virtue of which He can affirm that He alone knows God and knows God after the same fashion as God knows Him, with a knowledge that is the natural function of His sonship and therefore coeval with His sonship, whence also it is not said that the Son has learned to know the Father, but that He knows the Father.” (Geerhardus Vos)

For more on this subject, please visit the Biblical Theology page.

 

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The Mediator: God and Man

THE MEDIATOR: GOD AND MAN

“Man in innocence could not penetrate to God without a Mediator, much less could he after the fall…

It deeply concerned us, that He who was to be our Mediator should be very God and very man. If the necessity be inquired into, it was not what is commonly termed simple or absolute, but flowed from the divine decree on which the salvation of man depended… Our iniquities, like a cloud intervening between Him and us, having utterly alienated us from the kingdom of heaven, none but a person reaching to Him could be the medium of restoring peace. But who could thus reach to Him? Could any of the sons of Adam? All of them, with their parents, shuddered at the sight of God. Could any of the angels? They had need of a head, by connection with which they might adhere to their God entirely and inseparably. What then? The case was certainly desperate, if the Godhead itself did not descend to us, it being impossible for us to ascend. Thus the Son of God behooved to become our Immanuel, i.e., God with us; and in such a way, that by mutual union His divinity and our nature might be combined; otherwise,  neither was the proximity near enough, nor the affinity strong enough, to give us hope that God would dwell with us; so great was the repugnance between our pollution and the spotless purity of God. Had man remained free from all taint, he was of too humble a condition to penetrate to God without a Mediator. What, then must it have been, when by fatal ruin he was plunged into death and hell, defiled by so many stains, made loathsome corruption; in fine, overwhelmed with every curse? It is not without cause, therefore, that Paul, when he would set forth Christ as the Mediator, distinctly declares Him to be man. There is, says he, ‘one Mediator between God and man, the man Christ Jesus’ (1 Tim. 2:5). He might have called Him God, or at least, omitting to call Him God, he might also have omitted to call Him man; but because the Spirit, speaking by his mouth, knew our infirmity, he opportunely provides for it by the most appropriate remedy, setting the Son of God familiarly before us as one of ourselves. That no one, therefore, may feel perplexed where to seek the Mediator, or by what means to reach Him, the Spirit, by calling Him man, reminds us that He is near, no, contiguous to us, inasmuch as He is our flesh. And, indeed, he intimates the same thing in another place, where he explains a greater length that He is not a high priest who “cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin” (Heb. 4:15).” (John Calvin)

For more on this subject, please visit the Systematic Theology page.

The Person of Christ

THE PERSON OF CHRIST

“Our Lord, speaking in the most solemn manner, not only presents Himself, as the Son, as the sole source of knowledge of God and of blessedness for men, but places Himself in a position, not of equality merely, but of absolute reciprocity and interpenetration of knowledge with the Father. ‘No one,’ He says, ‘knoweth the Son, save the Father; neither doth any know the Father, save the Son…’ varied in Luke so as to read: ‘No one knoweth who the Son is, save the Father; and who the Father is, save the Son…’ as if the being of the Son were so immense that only God could know it thoroughly; and the knowledge of the Son was so unlimited that He could know God to perfection. The peculiarly pregnant employment here of the terms ‘Son’ and ‘Father’ over against one another is explained to us in the other utterance (Matt. 28:19). It is the resurrected Lord’s commission to His disciples. Claiming for Himself all authority in heaven and on earth–which implies the possession of omnipotence–and promising to be with His followers ‘always, even to the end of the world’ which adds the implications of omnipresence and omniscience–He commands them to baptize their converts ‘in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost.’ The precise form of the formula must be carefully observed. It does not read: ‘In the names’ (plural)—as if there were three beings enumerated, each with its distinguishing name. Nor yet: ‘In the name of the Father, Son and Holy Ghost,’ as if there were one person, going by a threefold name. It reads: ‘In the name [singular] of the Father, and of the [article repeated] Son, and of the [article repeated] Holy Ghost,’ carefully distinguishing three persons, though uniting them all under one name. The name of God was to the Jews Jehovah, and to name the name of Jehovah upon them was to make them His. What Jesus did in this great injunction was to command His followers to name the name of God upon their converts, and to announce the name of God which is to be named on their converts in the threefold enumeration of ‘the Father’ and ‘the Son’ and ‘the Holy Ghost.’ As it is unquestionable that He intended Himself by ‘the Son,’ He here places Himself by the side of the Father and the Spirit, as together with them constituting the one God. It is, of course, the Trinity which He is describing; and that is as much as to say that He announces Himself as one of the persons of the Trinity. This is what Jesus, as reported by the Synoptics, understood Himself to be.” (B.B. Warfield)

For more on the subject, visit the Systematic Theology page.

 

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