Notable & Newsworthy

Here are the various links and stories for the day…

Up to 45% OFF on Kevin DeYoung’s “Just Do Something: A Liberating Approach to Finding God’s Will” at Westminster Bookstore (ends 05/20)

Get R.C. Sproul’s “The Work of Christ” for FREE on Amazon Kindle

Last chance to win a stack of Danny Akin’s books from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary and 20 Schemes

Go to 20 Schemes and enter to win books from Brian Croft, Joel Beeke, Mez McConnell and Matthias Media

Head over to 20 Schemes and enter to win all of Jared Wilson’s books

Watch R.C. Sproul’s “The Last Days According to Jesus” for FREE at Ligonier

Check out the archives of The Gospel Magazine (1766–Present) for FREE

An excellent article by Anthony Bradley on the history of outsourcing and technological advances

27-year old pregnant Sudanese doctor faces execution for marrying a Christian man

A discussion about the Church, blindness, and disability on The Mortification of Spin podcast

The lazy moralism (and intolerance) of liberal college politics

David Powlison on the tendency of our hearts to grow dull to Scripture

Albert Mohler on contemporary Chrstianity’s impatience for the Word of God

“There is one lawgiver… We dare not attempt to be holier than God’s law, and we dare not impose upon the Christian’s conscience what does not have the authority of divine institution.” (John Murray)

“Complicity with error will take from the best of men the power to enter any successful protest against it.” (Charles Spurgeon)

Please take some time to browse the other pages on the site (located above in the tabs or listed to the right). You’ll find several articles, FREE e-books and book recommendations. Check out the Apologetics page or the Exegetical Theology page first. Thanks!

Developing a Trinitarian Mind

DEVELOPING A TRINITARIAN MIND

“In all the works of God He takes the initiative. He created in accordance with His free and sovereign will; no one was there to advise Him. In grace, the Son became incarnate ‘for us and our salvation’; this too was the result purely of the grace of God, undeserved, unprompted. In our own experience, God Himself brought us to new life by His Spirit; our faith and repentance is a response to His prior grace. We love Him because He first loved us. Is it any different in worship? Is that primarily something we do? No, first of all God goes before us. He has called His church to Himself. He is there to greet us. As we gather, it is to meet with Him, but first he has drawn us. Moreover, our acts of worship are accepted because they are offered in union with Christ. He, in our nature, is at the Father’s right hand. From this it follows that the elements of worship are a dialog in which the holy Trinity takes the initiative. Through His ordained servant, the Father through his Son by the Holy Spirit calls us to worship. He speaks to us in His Word read and proclaimed. He receives our praise and prayers. He communes with us in the sacrament. In the benediction he dismisses us with His blessing—which is far from a pious wish or prayer that such things might be, if it is the will of God. Rather, the benediction is a declaration of a real state of affairs, undergirded by His covenant promises. This is a dynamic view of worship, one that follows squarely in the Reformed tradition and is rooted in biblical teaching. Our congregations need to hear it, they need to understand it, they need to imbibe it and be permeated by it.” (Robert Letham)

For more on this subject, please visit the Systematic Theology page.

 

Recommended reading:

Friday with Ferguson

DISCOVERING GOD’S WILL

“Of course we have our spiritual liberties. But when we find ourselves unable to enjoy the Christian life without our liberties, then we have become enslaved to them. There is, for example, presumably no built-in evil about owning a new car, or living in pleasant house, or enjoying various foods, spending time in various pursuits, or with certain kinds of people. But when we cannot be content without them; when we simply must have them—they are no longer our liberties, but our chains. The Christian should develop in Christ a sensitivity to those things to which he will most readily allow himself to be brought into bondage. ‘Will this enslave me?’ will be a question never far from his thinking. ‘I will not be mastered by anything’ (2 Tim. 1:7) is a good motto text for the man who has received a spirit of self-discipline.” (Sinclair Ferguson)

For more on this subject, please visit the Pastoral Theology page.

 

Recommended reading: